STUDIO VISIT

Q.

Tell us about your creative process

A.

The process of my work usually starts in my head before taking any physical shape and existence. I consider myself a story teller and in order to create visual stories, I absorb a lot around me. People and places create phenomenon for me. I think as a maker of my works, I don’t find my story; it finds me, as an autobiography always does. It finds us out in our deepest most guarded spaces. I find that even unwantingly with each visua,l I am trying to create a personal narrative. The images reflect memories, angst, ennui, pleasure, taking shapes of hybrid figures that become facets of my persona, both real and imagined. Thus I liberate myself from the demons and angels in the process of making my work.

Q.

How does modern culture affect your work?

A.

I believe that the culture is tied up with our lives constantly, and as a sensitive person and being an artist, it for sure reflects in whatever I create. I find current times chaotic. In our modern lives there is more chaos and confusion then contentment and joy. I try to turn these enquiries into imaginations and the dark recesses of the human psyche shot through with pitch-black humor. The collage process is something between my dreams and documentation. I am trying to catch the casual feelings, naked and defenseless in their realism. I am looking for human simplicity and complexity in the same way and that’s why I use gist from everyday life; the objects of our lives, the worn, the used, the almost invisible items that convey the news. The draw full of odds and ends, the treasure chest of humanities that tie back our hair, that allows us to read a book in focus, that cut out newspaper articles on a warm Sunday morning. They are all unique, even when ordinary. I try to explore the blurred edges of existence. Taking in shadowy worlds behind closed doors, the arbitrary flux of identity and the mysteries of intentions, it brings into sharp focus the ambiguity at the heart of any photographic collage. They plough the psychoanalytical furrow and confirm the undisputed leading light of contemporary surrealism.

Q.

What inspires the style of your work?

A.

The affair that inspires my work transforms the common and the everyday into the disputed and the unreal and creates in the process a loaded, often perplexing world that is at once familiar and bizarre. In my visuals I am trying to capture the things that I see and feel, as a way of recording their fragility, power, terror and splendidness - so that I can return to those things and relive them. In that way, I try to have some sense of control in a chaotic world. My quest for inspiration is an everyday struggle, to access the emotions embedded below the superficial appearances, and to yank them out from behind the windowpane. This release from naturalism is the struggle between the ideas of creation and those of mutilation. The visuals explore the language of dreams, buried desires and psychoanalysis.