Q&A

Q.

When did you find your calling as an artist?

A.

My grandmother was an artist, she never pursued it professionally but as a child I used to sit for hours watching her paint. She guided me and taught me. She took me to various competitions around the city, paraded me at family dinners with my art medals around my neck. She believed in me, and made me believe in my art and that’s how I landed in an art school as BFA student.

Q.

Tell us about your work, when and how did you choose the medium you work in?

A.

They say that one needs a bit of soul stirring to make art, for me that happened when I went to Saudi Arabia for Hajj and came back to a need to create movement of an energy on paper in its truest raw form. I took out my grandmothers old Singers machine and started creating energy on paper. Nothing is ever hidden with a pierce. Once a mark is made on paper or fabric, it is there to stay.

Q.

Could you tell us about your technique and what is the process for the creation of your pieces?

A.

The work has evolved over a period and found rest in deconstructing found imageries, ideas and theories of narratives that revolve around love and other trajectories. The process involves collecting narratives in tapestry and found objects and deconstructing the fabric of it to reconstruct it on newer fabrics with a more contemporary familiar narrative.

Q.

What inspires you?

A.

Images, put together homes, interiors, watching people, the colour white, my girls, big gardens with big trees, working with artisans who come in with their own stories.

Q.

Who are your favorite artists?

A.

My grandmother, Farrukh Agha, Tracey Emin, Shireen Nishat, Annette Messenger, Shahzia Sikander, Yayoi Kusama, Kara Walker, Jenny Saville, Marina Abramovich and so many more!

Q.

Where do you see yourself in ten years?

A.

In MOMA, sipping tea and giving an audience a personal tour of my work.