STUDIO VISIT

Q.

Tell us about your creative process

A.

I like to print everyday found objects that most people discard. I pick them up on the street or at recycling places. A flattened aluminum can, a vinyl, a lace... I use them as printing material to reveal on paper their texture and hidden beauty. Instead of using a transfer material, I usually ink the object itself and print it directly onto the paper. The texture and embossing give an even more intimate feeling to the work. Although I might use an object several times, each print is unique. The quality of the paper (sometimes made with my own discarded prints), the placement on the paper, the inking choices I make, the details I add while printing, all of this contributes to make a mono- print.

Q.

What inspires the style of your work in this series?

A.

In my series of ‘Platter’, a lost world of music comes to life again! I play with the size of the vinyl (33, 45 or 78) and with the very fine groves to make the recorded music visible. I discovered that the design of the surface changes depending on the type of music. A classical piece is longer, hence, wider than a pop song. Sometimes, I exaggerate the scratches - like music going wild.

Q.

What is your message to your viewers?

A.

As consumeristic relics, I propose the story of the found object to the viewer. My work is spontaneous and allows me to explore the world of pop-art and to question with some humor the challenges of our modern society, in particular consumerism, feminism, the mundane, the exclusion. They provide an X-ray vision of our society. On a personal level of interpretation, they represent memories that are at the foundation of our identity. A cotton dress belonging to a handmade trousseau, a LP record that takes us back to the past; they become a visual testimony of our self and question the meaning of our life.